Alphas Rewatch: Episode 1

Series: Alphas Rewatch

Spoilers: Alphas season 1, episode 1

MV5BMTQ1NTIyODQ4N15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNTA2MzQxOA@@__V1_SY317_CR12,0,214,317_AL_

Image Description: Poster divided into six pictures, each a close up of one character’s face. All seem active and engaged in something, and only Nina is looking directly at the camera. Top left is Cameron Hicks (Warren Christie), a white man in his thirties. Top center: Nina Theroux (Laura Menell), a (white?) woman of a similar age. Top right is Dr. Rosen (David Strathairn), an older white man. Bottom left shows Rachel Pirzad (Azita Ghanizada),a young woman of Middle Eastern descent, bottom center Bill Harken (Malik Yoba), a middle aged black man. In the bottom right is Gary Bell (Ryan Cartwright), a young white man. Below the pictures is the name of the show, “Alphas”, and the tagline “Super, but human.”
(picture from IMDB.com)

Continue reading

Advertisements

Dear Doctor Who Writers: You’ve Got Some Work to Do

Warning: Discussion of ableism, use of some ableist words (quoted for purposes of clarity)
Spoiler Warning: Spoilers for the first three episodes of Doctor Who season 9, as well as the title of the fourth.

First off, I really enjoyed Doctor Who’s two part season opener–mostly.

That said, there were some things that really bothered me. Some were continuations of behaviors from season eight, others were escalations which took things far beyond what I was expecting, to the point that I actually managed to block them from my memory until someone else’s comment reminded me of them.

Now get ready, because spoilers are coming.

Continue reading

Blogging Against Disablism Day: Doctor Who and Disability

Spoilers: Spoilers for some events and characters through Series Four of the rebooted Doctor Who. No significant spoilers after that.

Warnings: This review discusses ableism and references certain events during the Holocaust.

Dalekinvasion_305

Image Description: Alan Judd as Dortman, a freedom fighter in the First Doctor serial “The Dalek Invasion of the Earth”. He is one of the few physically disabled characters in the series.

Continue reading

Realm-o-Ween: The Scarily Late Conclusion

Series: Realm-o-Ween

Warning: This post involves some very personal and frank discussion of my experiences as a disabled person. This includes mention of times that I have been suicidal. It also references murder, specifically murders committed by the police and by parents against their own children, as reflects recent real life events.

Continue reading

Realm-o-Ween: AHS Freak Show

Series: Realm-o-Ween

Spoiler Warning: American Horror Story: Freak Show (episode one, Monsters Among Us)

Trigger Warning: Discussion of abuse, violence, murder, possible rape, and ableism. I also use both the q-slur and the word ‘freak’ in the review, uncensored.

MV5BMjA1MzAwNjYzMl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMDg1ODU3MjE@._V1_SX214_AL_

Image from IMDB.com

Continue reading

Representation in Orange is the New Black

It’s likely that you’ve heard of Orange is the New Black, a Netflix original show which recently put up its second season. There are some exciting storytelling possibilities with shows like this, which I may look at in the future, but for now let’s look at the diversity in this particular show, because diversity is one of the things which makes it so popular.

MV5BMjA1ODMzNDM5Ml5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNDU0NjQ5MTE@._V1__SX1303_SY572_

Image: Orange is the New Black poster

Continue reading

Review: Akata Witch

Spoiler Warning: Akata Witch (only in one specific section, which is noted beforehand)

Trigger Warning: Discussion of ableist tropes in fiction

9780670011964M

Recently, I read Nnedi Okorafor’s Akata Witch. It’s a young adult fantasy novel, set in Nigeria, which came out back in 2011 from Penguin Books. If you enjoy narratives about characters discovering their magic, or are interested in learning about magic in a culture that isn’t often seen represented in the US, I highly recommend this book. It’s a lot of fun, and the characters are vibrant and interesting.

I’d also like to point out that the cover art actually fits the book.

The main character, Sunny, is 12.  She’s American-born, but moved to Nigeria with her parents and brothers. Sunny, like most of the people she knows, is Igbo, but often feels out of place because she is (a) from America, and (b) an albino.  Nnedi Okorafor herself is also American-born, and her parents were Nigerian immigrants. During the book, Sunny makes new friends and meets new enemies as she discovers the world of Leopard People, African sorcerers.

Continue reading