Review: Inside Out

Spoiler Warning: None

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Image Description: Poster for Inside Out, Five cartoon characters, personifying fear (back left, a purple man in a sweater vest cowering from…something), joy (back center, a Disney Tinkerbell-esque figure with blue hair and fair skin), disgust (back right, a green woman with long eyelashes and a look of disgust), anger (front left, a short red man with a shirt and tie and his head on fire), and sadness (front right, a short, roundish blue woman with big glasses) stand in front of a background of colorful circles. At the bottom, the tag line “Meet the voices inside your head” and the date “June 19.” Image taken from IMDB, film by Disney Pixar.

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Disability in Animation: How to Train Your Dragon 2

Series: Disability in Children’s Animation

Spoiler Warnings: How to Train Your Dragon 2

Trigger/Content Warnings: Loss of limbs. Also, I won’t be talking about it here, but the movie deals with parental abandonment.

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Image Description: How to Train your Dragon theatrical poster. An ensemble shot of Hiccup and his friends, as well as their dragons.

Yesterday I went to see How to Train Your Dragon 2, which is currently in theaters.

I loved it. There were some things about the portrayal of female characters, good and bad, which I want to talk about, but I’m going to save that for a future post. There were also some race things (the villain had significantly darker skin), but again, future post, perhaps once the movie comes out on DVD.

For now, I’m going to talk a little bit about how this franchise has continued to handle disability. But first, a quick, spoiler-free review:

This movie is gorgeous. I am far from an expert on animation, but you could see the pores on people’s faces. They aged their characters beautifully, and the relationships, the romantic ones especially, feel very genuine. The story was interesting, but between the dragons, the people, and the environments, I was really blown away by the visuals. There are some really cool female characters, although they could definitely stand to have more to do. And of course, the protagonist is disabled. For the most part they handle disability well, although there is some ableism surrounding mental disability. The movie also had some problems with racism (the only dark-skinned character in the movie is a villain). Still, I highly recommend that you go see this movie, while it’s still in theaters if possible. Not only is it a great movie which looks amazing on the big screen, but you’ll be supporting one of the few franchises with a disabled protagonist.

Now, let’s look closer at the handling of disabilities (spoilers below):

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Disability in Animation: How to Train Your Dragon

Series: Disability in Children’s Animation

Spoiler Warnings: How to Train Your Dragon. Also some spoilers for the series, Dragons: Riders of Berk, though not specific episodes.

Trigger/Content Warnings: Loss of limbs. Also, I won’t be talking about it here, but if you watch the movie I would warn that things get pretty rough verbally between Hiccup and his Dad. It all works out in the end, but if abandonment is a trigger for you, be aware.

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Image Description: How to Train Your Dragon theatrical poster. Hiccup is reaching out to Toothless the Dragon.

How to Train Your Dragon came out from Dreamworks in 2010, a couple years before Wreck-It Ralph and Frozen. It was based (somewhat loosely) on a book by Cressida Crowell (which I haven’t read, so I can’t comment on it at this point). It had a budget of 165 million dollars and grossed about 494 million worldwide. Not as successful as Frozen, but successful none the less.

In fact, it was successful enough to spawn a series, which finished its second season in March, and a sequel (How to Train Your Dragon 2), which is currently in theaters. The sequel will be the subject of tomorrow’s post.

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